Mandrill

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Animalia Primates Cercopithecidae Mandrillus Mandrillus sphinx
Mandrill
IUCN Status: Vulnerable
  • Common Name: Mandrill
  • Taxonomy Classification Year: 1758
  • Monkey Size: 61 to 76.4 cm (24.02 to 30.08 in)
  • Skin Color(s): Olive green
  • Habitat: Forest, rainforest
  • Diet: Omnivorous
  • Native Countries: Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Democratic Republic of Congo

Mandrill Distribution

Mandrill Characteristics

Mandrill

The mandrill[1] (Mandrillus sphinx) is a primate of the Old-World monkey family (Cercopithecidae). It is among the two species in the Mandrillus genus and drill.

  • The mandrills reach a height of around 80 cm. The species features a large head, a compact body with long, powerful limbs, and an erect stubby tail.
  • The wide range of rotation of the clavicles allows for quadrupedal walking, tree climbing, and arm function.
  • The opposable thumbs allow these monkeys to grasp tree branches. Both sexes have paired mammary glands in the chest region.
  • The coat is olive green with lighter underparts. It has a bright blue to bare purple rump.
  • A mandrill’s face has a red stripe down the center of the snout and around the nostrils, while the sides of the snout are striped lengthwise and blue in color.
  • Mandrills have patches of red fur over their eyes and a yellow beard. These colorations are duller in females and juveniles than in adult males.

What Do Mandrills Eat?

The Mandrill nourishes on[¶]:

  • Butter Tree (Pentadesma butyracea).
  • Boleko Nut (Ongokea gore).
  • African Nutmeg (Pycnanthus angolensis).
  • African Teak (Milicia excelsa).
  • African Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis).
  • Persimmons (Diospyros)

What Eats Mandrills?

What Eats Mandrills?

Leopards (Panthera pardus) are the primary predators of Mandrills[§].

Mandrill Facts

Mandrillus Sphinx

  • Groups of mandrills can vary from a few individuals to 50 individuals.
  • Although the dominant male will often wander away from the group, he will return immediately at the slightest sign of danger.
  • Mandrills live on the ground during the day and sleep in trees at night.
  • Their bright coloring in the female species is a crucial feature of social behavior. For example, when aroused, the padding on her buttocks intensifies blue, her chest turns blue, and red dots may appear on her ankles and wrists.
  • To show his delight, a male mandrill shakes his head and shoulders; it is usually an invitation to settle down.

Mandri

Suggested Reading: Explore All Monkeys

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BioExplorer.net. (2022, October 02). Mandrill. Bio Explorer. https://www.bioexplorer.net/animals/mammals/monkeys/mandrill/.
BioExplorer.net. "Mandrill" Bio Explorer, 02 October 2022, https://www.bioexplorer.net/animals/mammals/monkeys/mandrill/.
BioExplorer.net. "Mandrill" Bio Explorer, October 02 2022. https://www.bioexplorer.net/animals/mammals/monkeys/mandrill/.
Key References
  • [1]“Mandrill | San Diego Zoo Animals & Plants”. Accessed August 17, 2022. Link.
  • [¶] – Fricke, E.C., Svenning, J. Accelerating homogenization of the global plant-frugivore meta-network. Nature 585, 74-78 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2640-y.
  • [¶] – Seltzer, Carrie; Wysocki, William; Palacios, Melissa; Eickhoff, Anna; Pilla, Hannah; Aungst, Jordan; Mercer, Aaron; Quicho, Jamie; Voss, Neil; Xu, Man; J. Ndangalasi, Henry; C. Lovett, Jon; J. Cordeiro, Norbert (2015): Plant-animal interactions from Africa. figshare. https://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1526128. De Boer, W.F. and Ntumi, C.P. and Correia, A.U. and Mafuca, J.M., 2000. Diet and distribution of elephant in the Maputo Elephant Reserve; Mozambique. African Journal of Ecology, 38(3), pp.188-201. https://ndownloader.figshare.com/files/2231424
  • [§] – Middleton, O.S, Svensson, H, Scharlemann, J.P.W, Faurby, S, Sandom, C.J. CarniDIET 1.0: A database of terrestrial carnivorous mammal diets. Global Ecology and Biogeography. https://doi.org/10.1111/geb.13296. Craig, Christie A., Eleanor I. Brassine, and Daniel M. Parker. “A record of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) diet in the Northern Tuli Game Reserve, Botswana.”�African Journal of Ecology55.4 (2017): 697-700.

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