Baboon Monkeys

Hamadryas Baboon

Species Name: Papio hamadryas
The Hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas) is a baboon species in the Old World monkey family. The Hamadryas baboon was a sacred animal to the ancient Egyptians. It appeared in various roles in ancient Egyptian religion, hence its alternative common name, "sacred baboon".

Guinea Baboon

Species Name: Papio papio
The Guinea baboon (Papio papio) is a baboon of the Old World monkey family. When walking, these baboons support their weight on the bottom of their toes in front and on the entire sole of their feet.

Gray-Cheeked Mangabey

Species Name: Lophocebus albigena
The gray-cheeked mangabey (Lophocebus albigena), also called the white-cheeked mangabey, is an Old World monkey found in the forests of central Africa. Gray-cheeked mangabeys belong to the same family (Cercopithecinae) and phylum (Papionini) as mandrills, macaques, and baboons.

Gelada

Species Name: Theropithecus gelada
The gelada often called the gelada baboon, or the bleeding-heart monkey, is an Old-World monkey found only in the Ethiopian highlands. Geladas aren't territorial, and it is not unusual to find congregations of separate groups foraging together when conditions are favorable.

Drill

Species Name: Mandrillus leucophaeus
The Drill is a primate in the Cercopithecidae family (Old-World monkeys), related to baboons and even more closely to mandrills. Like mandrills, drills are highly social animals that live in groups of around 20 individuals with multiple males and females, with one male dominating reproductive decisions.

Chacma Baboon

Species Name: Papio ursinus
Like all other baboons, the Chacma baboon, the Cape baboon, belongs to the Old-World monkey family. Chacma baboons have a habit of flipping over rocks in search of food. So, it's pretty easy to spot where a group of Chacmas once foraged.

Black-crested mangabey

Species Name: Lophocebus aterrimus
Black-crested mangabeys, also known as black mangabeys, are endemic to central Africa, occupying the Democratic Republic of the Congo, south of the Congo River (formerly known as the Zaire River), and likely extinct in Angola. They are mainly found in primary and secondary tropical forests, gallery forests, and swamps. Locals nicknamed these primates "baboon mangabeys" due to their resemblance to the baboon species.

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