Ethiopia Monkeys

Mantled Guereza

Species Name: Colobus guereza
The mantled guereza (Colobus guereza), also known as the guereza, Abyssinian black-and-white colobus, or eastern black-and-white colobus, is a black-and-white colobus, a species of Old World monkey. The mantled guerezas are typically diurnal.

Vervet Monkey

Species Name: Chlorocebus pygerythrus
The vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) is an Old World monkey of the Cercopithecidae family endemic to southern and eastern Africa. Not only can vervet monkeys skilfully navigate through the treetops, but they can also swim.

Olive Baboon

Species Name: Papio anubis
The Olive baboon (Papio anubis), also called the Anubis baboon, is a species of the Cercopithecidae family of Old-World monkeys. The name comes from the Egyptian god Anubis.

Hamadryas Baboon

Species Name: Papio hamadryas
The Hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas) is a baboon species in the Old World monkey family. The Hamadryas baboon was a sacred animal to the ancient Egyptians. It appeared in various roles in ancient Egyptian religion, hence its alternative common name, "sacred baboon".

Grivet Monkey

Species Name: Chlorocebus aethiops
The Grivet monkey (Chlorocebus aethiops) is an Old World monkey with long tufts of white fur on the sides of its face. Grivet monkeys are very social animals. They travel in small groups and are among the few species to have groups with multiple males.

Gelada

Species Name: Theropithecus gelada
The gelada often called the gelada baboon, or the bleeding-heart monkey, is an Old-World monkey found only in the Ethiopian highlands. Geladas aren't territorial, and it is not unusual to find congregations of separate groups foraging together when conditions are favorable.

De Brazza’s Monkey

Species Name: Cercopithecus neglectus
De Brazza's monkey is an Old-World primate native to central Africa's swamp and riverine forests. It is the largest species of the guenon family and one of the most widespread African arboreal primates.

Bale Monkey

Species Name: Chlorocebus djamdjamensis
The Bale monkey, also called the Bale Mountain Vervet, is an endangered, forest-dwelling arboreal primate restricted to a small range in the southern highlands of Ethiopia. The bale monkey depends primarily on a single species of bamboo (Arundinaria Alpina) and favors a bamboo forest habitat. These African primates feature small round heads, and their bodies are covered with a layer of dark-brown fur.

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