25 Most Famous & Dangerous Carnivorous Plants

Carnivorous Plants

Carnivorous Plants: Animals eating plants is a common thing. What about the other way around? Is this even possible?

By definition, the word carnivory refers to the practice of organisms to derive their energy and nutrient requirement through predation. And yes, (some) plants can consume animals too. For instance, this adaptation is called plant carnivory and this refers to the ability of some plants to trap and consume insects and other small animals. But what would make a plant select a diet of insect or meat?

While they certainly make use of photosynthesis to make their own food and generate energy, these kinds of plants make up their protein intake by trapping and eventually digesting insects and small animals.

Also, carnivorous plants are not rare but they usually thrive in habitats with extreme environmental conditions. They live in extreme habitats where the soil generally lacks nutrients and these kinds of plants have turned to other sources. But again, contrary to the term “carnivorous“, these plant do not eat or consume flesh and meat, therefore, they are harmless to humans.

Excited yet? The amazing world of carnivorous plants is definitely worth exploring! So let’s not make this any longer; here are the 25 most famous and most dangerous carnivorous plants.

Carnivorous Plants

1. Venus Flytrap (Dionaea Muscipula)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Droseraceae Dionaea Dionaea muscipula

Venus FlytrapIndigenous to North and South Carolina, the Venus flytrap[1], is probably the most classic and the meanest carnivorous plant of all.

  • Most of the time, these plants thrive in nutrient-poor soils and thus practice carnivory in order to get more nutrients from insects.
  • The leaves of this carnivorous plant are characterized by having stiff sensitive hairs. If by any chance these hairs are touched, the two lobes of the leaves will snap shut, trapping anything inside. Interestingly, in about twelve hours, when the plant realizes that the object is not a food, the leaves will open and spit the trap out.
  • Because of the over-fascination of people with these plants, many of them are now becoming endangered.
  • The Venus flytrap is a monotypic genus; meaning it is the only species (D. muscipula) in its genus (Dionaea).

2. Waterwheel Plant (Aldrovanda Vesiculosa)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Droseraceae Aldrovanda Aldrovanda vesiculosa

Waterwheel PlantThe Waterwheel plant[2] is a rootless and free-floating aquatic plant closely related to the Venus flytrap. Like the flytrap, this plant works as a snapping trap with fine, sensitive hairs, only underwater!.

  • Basically, this plant is characterized by a single whorl of leaves shaped like a wheel (hence the name).
  • The genus name of this plant was originally derived from its Italian discoverer, Ulisse Aldrovandi. However, the famous taxonomist who catalogued the plant misspelled it as “Aldrovanda” instead. Hence,at present, we use the incorrect spelling of the name.

3. Sundew (Drosera Sp.)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Droseraceae Drosera Drosera sp.

Sundew (Drosera) Also known to be the “master of sticky fly paper[3]“, the Sundew Drosera is an insect trap that captures its prey with its numerous sticky hairs. These hairs produce digestive enzymes (like proteases and phosphatases) that tend to degrade the trapped prey.

  • The common name of this plant is derived from the characteristics of its leaves to shine like dew in the sun.
  • As compared to the Venus flytrap, this plant is relatively slower.

4. Albany Pitcher Plant (Cephalotus Follicularis)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Oxalidales Cephalotaceae Cephalotus Cephalotus follicularis

Albany Pitcher PlantFirst discovered in southern Australia by French expeditioner Bruni d’Entrecasteaux, the Albany Pitcher plant Cephalotus follicularis[4] is a monotypic genus. In addition to that, it is the only species in the plant family Cephalotaceae.

  • This low-growing plant is characterized by having hairy pitfall traps with two kinds of leaves: the carnivorous pitcher leaves and the non-carnivorous ones. This carnivorous plant typically grow its non-carnivorous leaves to provide energy to the plant (from photosynthesis) before growing its pitchers.
  • Its scientific name Cephalotus follicularis was derived from the Greek word “kephalotus” which means “headed“, and from the Latin word “folliculus” which means “a littles sack“. Such names describe the filaments of the stamens, and the shape of the plant’s pitchers respectively.

5. Cobra Lily (Darlingtonia Californica)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Ericales Sarraceniaceae Darlingtonia Darlingtonia californica

Cobra LilyThe next carnivorous plant is Endemic to Northern California and Southern Oregon, the Cobra lily is a predatory plant that has evolved various mechanisms to trap and digest prey.

  • Also called as the California pitcher plant, this plant lures insects into its pitcher-like modified leaf with nectar on its downward-facing opening.
  • Its common name is derived from its pitcher which is cobra-like in appearance.

6. Dewy Pine (Drosophyllum Lusitanicum)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Droseraceae Drosophyllum Drosophyllum lusitanicum

Dewy PineThe next plant in this list is the Dew pine Drosophyllum lusitanicum[5] which is indigenous to Portugal, Spain, and Morocco.

  • Interestingly, these plants lure prey by emitting honey and when it lives in the wild, it mimics the black.
  • When young, these plants need an ample supply of water but as they grow older, their need for water becomes less.

7. Heliamphora (Heliamphora Sp.)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Ericales Sarraceniaceae Heliamphora Heliamphora sp.

HeliamphoraNative to the both tropical and high altitudes, the Heliamphora[6]is a carnivorous plant that has rolled leaves and fused axes that form the body of the tubular traps.

  • According to studies, this plant is not good at catching insects, which is most likely based from the average number of insects trapped at the bottom of its leaves.
  • The name of this plant is derived from the same word which literally means “marsh pitcher” as this plant is commonly found in those kinds of habitats.

8. Butterworts (Pinguicula Moranensis)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Lamiales Lentibulariaceae Pinguicula Pinguicula moranensis

ButterwortNative throughout North America to Siberia and from Central to South America, the Butterwort Pinguicula[7] is a small herbaceous plant famous for its flowers pollinated by hummingbirds.

  • In Latin,the word “Pinguicula” literally means “little greasy one“, with reference to its greasy feel when touched.
  • The leaves of these plants are covered in short sticky hairs that secrete enzymes and acids that can dissolve and degrade their prey.

9. Bladderwort (Utricularia)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Lamiales Lentibulariaceae Utricularia Utricularia sp.

BladderwortThe Bladderwort Utricularia[8]is a free-floating annual plant that has no roots yet has flowers and rigid stems. These plants are unique in the sense that their underwater leaves with “bladders” that can catch and dissolve prey.

  • Most of the time, bladderworts thrive in acidic, and shallow waters.
  • In terms of food value for plant and wildlife, this plant has no value but it can serve as habitat for small fish and insects.

10. North American Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia Sp.)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Ericales Sarraceniaceae Sarracenia Sarracenia sp.

North American Pitcher PlantThe North American[9] Pitcher plant Sarracenia is a type of carnivorous plant known to inhabit the lakes of Texas, eastern seaboard, and Canada, hence its name.

  • Like most of the plants in this list, this kind of pitcher plant prey on insects without moving any of its body parts. Its trap consist of luring insects with its sweet scent and nectar, and its funnel-shaped leaves that contains digestive enzymes to digest its prey.
  • In order to avoid rainwater from diluting these enzymes, this plant has developed a hood like structure above its opening.

11. Tropical Pitcher Plant (Nepenthes Sp.)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Nepenthaceae Nepenthes Nepenthes sp.

Tropical Pitcher PlantThe Tropical Pitcher plant Nepenthes[10] is another carnivorous pitcher plant indigenous to the tropical regions like Southeast Asia and India.

  • Due to its attractive scent and appearance, insects and other small animals become encouraged to fall into its pitcher-like leaves containing digestive enzymes at the bottom of the trap,.
  • Interestingly, the Tropical Pitcher plant is also called as “Monkey cups” because of the habit of tropical monkeys to drink the fluid from the pitchers.

12. Attenborough’s Pitcher Plant (Nepenthes Attenboroughii)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Nepenthaceae Nepenthes Nepenthes attenboroughii

Nepenthes AttenboroughiiThis next plant is the Attenborough’s Pitcher plant[11], known to be found only in the slopes and summit of Mount Victoria in central Palawan, Philippines.

  • Like any other pitcher plant, the Attenborough’s pitcher plant has a funnel-like leaf structure where insects become trapped in and eventually digested.
  • Because of its low seed-variability and dispersion as well as the rampant collection of, tourist, this plant is very hard to grow and is nearly endangered.
  • This species of pitcher plant is named after the famous British natural history broadcaster David Attenborough.

13. Rafflesia Pitcher Plant (Nepenthes Rafflesiana)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Nepenthaceae Nepenthes Nepenthes rafflesiana

Nepenthes RafflesianaNepenthes? Rafflesia? Both sound familiar, right? Basically, this species of pitcher plant[12] is very common in the lowland areas of Borneo (specifically Brunei), Malaysia, and Singapore.

  • Unlike other pitcher plants, this species of Nepenthes is often visited by insects but it appears that it does not specialized in degrading them as its fluid is not of viscous consistence.
  • This species of Nepenthes is highly variable[13] and comes in a wide variety of sizes, colors, and forms.

14. Side-Saddle Flower (Sarracenia Purpurea)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Ericales Sarraceniaceae Sarracenia Sarracenia purpurea

Sarracenia PurpureaKnown as the Side-saddle flower or the Purple Pitcher plant, the Sarracenia purpurea[14], is a carnivorous flowering plant endemic to North America, and some parts of Europe.

  • Like any other species of Sarracenia and plants in this list, this plant obtains nutrients most of its nutrients from its prey. Basically, it uses its pitcher-like leaf structure which contains digestive enzymes to dissolve them.
  • Some native American tribes utilize this plant as a source of medicine.

15. Yellow Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia Flava)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Ericales Sarraceniaceae Sarracenia Sarracenia flava

Sarracenia FlavaThe next plant in this list is the Yellow Pitcher plant[15], which is considered as one of the tallest pitcher plants in the world.

  • This plant has pitcher-shaped leaves which primarily serve to attract insects with nectar, trap them inside, and dissolve them while alive.
  • This plant is easily distinguished from other pitcher plant species from its distinct yellow green (with sometimes red veins) pitchers.

16. Parrot Pitcher Plant (Sarracenia Psittacina)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Ericales Sarraceniaceae Sarracenia Sarracenia psittacina

Sarracenia PsittacinaThe Parrot Pitcher plant[16]Sarracenia psittacina is a type of carnivorous plant found to inhabit the boggy areas of pine forests. .

  • The mature pitcher leaf structure of this plant is characterized by a red purple-hood, somewhat resembling a parrot (hence its name).
  • Interestingly, the Exyra moth is one of the few insects that can live inside the pitcher but doesn’t get killed.

17. Veitch’s Pitcher-Plant (Nepenthes Veitchii)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Nepenthaceae Nepenthes Nepenthes veitchii

Nepenthes VeitchiiIndigenous to the Hose Mountain of Sarawak, Borneo, the Veitch Pitcher[17] plant is very famous for having one of the largest peristome (opening of the pitcher) among the genus Nepenthes.

  • Interestingly, this plant grows via its stem elongating horizontally rather than vertically.
  • This species of Pitcher plant is also unique as it can thrive in cold highland temperatures.

18. Byblis (Byblis Sp.)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Lamiales Byblidaceae Nepenthes Byblis sp.

ByblisThe next plant in this list is the Byblis[18], a carnivorous desert plant that somehow resembles a sundew.

  • It is characterized by sticky hairs that can trap insects because they are deceived into thinking that they are nectar.
  • However, unlike the sundew, the hairs of the Byblis do not curl around the captured insect.
  • In Australia (where it is endemic), this plant is also called as the Rainbow plant.

19. Triphyophyllum Peltatum

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Caryophyllales Dioncophyllaceae Triphyophyllum Triphyophyllum peltatum

Triphyophyllum PeltatumRegarded as the largest carnivorous plant, the Triphyophyllum[19] peltatum is restricted to west Africa.

  • Interestingly, this plant produces three types of leaves: (1) lance-shaped leaves, (2) short leaves that terminate with hooks, and the (3) carnivorous leaves that has glands that produce enzymes to dissolve its prey.
  • In relation to above, this plant can produce hooks that can grow as long vines with 70 meters length!.

20. Brocchinia Reducta

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Poales Bromeliaceae Brocchinia Brocchinia reducta

Brocchinia ReductaThe Brocchinia reducta[20] is a carnivorous plant characterized by its leaves shaped like an organ pipe. These organ pipe-like leaves are not hollow but rather are filled with water and “juices” from the insects that fell into the trap.

  • Its genus name Brocchinia is derived from the name of its Italian discoverer, Giovanni Battista Brocchi.
  • This plant is endemic to South America, especially to Venezuela, Brazil, and Colombia.

21. Trigger Plants (Stylidium Sp.)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Asterales Stylidiaceae Stylidium Stylidium sp.

StylidiumAs its name suggests, the Trigger plant[21] Stylidium is a very sensitive plant easily triggered by any insect landing on its flower column. It also has stalked mucous glands that produce enzymes for digesting its prey.

  • Its genus name comes from the Greek word “stylos” which refers to the united male reproductive organ of the flower.
  • This plant genus has more than 130 species, which are mostly found[22] in Australia and some in Asia.

22. Roridula Sp.

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Ericales Roridulaceae Roridula Roridula sp.

RoridulaUnlike most plant carnivores in this list, the Roridula[23]does not produce enzymes that can digest the trapped insect. Instead, it produces resin which is much stronger than the enzyme produced by the sundew.

  • In order to make use of its captured prey, this plant lives in symbiosis with assassin bugs that can suck the nutrients from the captured insect while their increments are absorbed by the plant itself.
  • This plant derived its name from the Latin word “roridos” and Greek word “gorgon” which mean “dewy” and “terrible” respectively.

23. Genlisea Sp.

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Lamiales Lentibulariaceae Genlisea Genlisea sp.

GenliseaThe next carnivorous plant in this list is the Genlisea[24] that grows in wet areas of Madagascar, Zambia, and Tanzania.

  • Scientists consider this plant as a close relative to Utricularia as both produce their traps underwater.
  • The name of this plant is derived from the name of the French writer Contesse Stéphanie-Félicité du Crest de Saint-Aubin de Genlis.

24. Jungle Lantern (Catopsis Berteroniana)

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Poales Bromeliaceae Catopsis Catopsis berteroniana

Jungle LanternThese penultimate carnivorous plants are Endemic to Central America and Southern Brazil, the Jungle lantern plant is a type of bromeliad famous for its iridescent yellow flower.

  • This plant is also covered in a powdery wax that further brightens its color. Because of that, it is also referred to as the “Yellow strap plant“.
  • Coming from the Greek word “katopsis[25] which means “view“, this plant with the same name truly gives an attractive view especially when seen from their perches in treetops.
  • This plant catch insects in its urn-like structure filled with digestive fluids that dissolve its prey. However, scientists still argue whether this plant is a true carnivore.

25. Philcoxia Minensis

Kingdom Order Family Genus Species
Plantae Lamiales Plantaginaceae Philcoxia Philcoxia minensis

Last but definitely not the least carnivorous plants are the Philcoxia minensis[26], a worm-eating plant endemic to the savannah regions of Brazil.

  • This plant has underwater leaves, about the size of pinheads, can actually trap insects, digest them, and eventually used them as fertilizer to the soil.

Imagine that you are an insect looking for a place to land. Suddenly, you see a very attractive leaf adorned with various hairs on its surface. You tried to land on it and then after one-tenth of a second, you were caught in a snap. You have no other way out. You have no other choice but to simply wait inside until you get digested in a few days.

Isn’t it a very tragic way to die?

Cite this article as: "25 Most Famous & Dangerous Carnivorous Plants," in Bio Explorer, March 20, 2017, http://www.bioexplorer.net/carnivorous-plants.html/.

References

  • [1]“Pitcher Plant Farm”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [2]“The Carnivorous Plant FAQ: Aldrovanda: the waterwheel plant”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [3]“Drosera, Carnivorous Plants Online – Botanical Society of America”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [4]“Cephalotus follicularis – FlytrapCare.com”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [5]“Dewy Pines (Drosophyllum lusitanicum).” Dewy Pines (Drosophyllum lusitanicum). Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [6]“International Carnivorous Plant Society”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [7]“Butterworts (Pinguicula).” Butterworts (Pinguicula). Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [8]“Bladderwort « AQUAPLANT”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [9]“All About the North American Pitcher Plant”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [10]“Nepenthes, pitcher plant growing”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [11]“Nepenthes attenboroughii (Attenborough's Pitcher Plant)”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [12]“Nepenthes from Borneo – Nepenthes rafflesiana”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [13]“Request Rejected”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [14]“Purple Pitcher Plant Or Side-saddle Flower (sarracenia Purpurea Stock Photo, Royalty Free Image: 48666023 – Alamy”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [15]“Yellow Pitcherplant”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [16]“Sarracenia psittacina, Carnivorous Plants Online – Botanical Society of America”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [17]“Nepenthes veitchii”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [18]“Byblis, Carnivorous Plants Online – Botanical Society of America”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [19]“Triphyophyllum peltatum, Carnivorous Plants Online – Botanical Society of America”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [20]“International Carnivorous Plant Society”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [21]“Stylidium graminifolium”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [22]“The Carnivorous Plant FAQ: What is Stylidium like?”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [23]“Roridula gorgonias – Ark of Life, stopping extinction”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [24]“International Carnivorous Plant Society”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [25]“Catopsis: A Uniquely Beautiful Bromeliad – Bromeliad Plant Care”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
  • [26]“Worm-eating plant Philcoxia minensis discovered in Brazil traps prey on its sticky underground leaves | Daily Mail Online”. Accessed March 19, 2017. Link.
25 Most Famous & Dangerous Carnivorous Plants
5 (100%) 1 vote

LEAVE A REPLY